Certified Strength Conditioning Specialist Comprehensive Questions Set #2

CSCS Comprehensive Questions 3

Sam is a 17-year-old, male football linebacker. He is 6’ tall and weighs 190 pounds. He enjoys playing football and is also an excellent student with a 4.0 grade point average. Today is the first day of preseason conditioning so he will be performing a battery of tests to determine a baseline of his athletic ability. As the head strength and conditioning coach for your school, you’ve setup equipment to test your athletes. Today’s tests include the T-test, pro agility test, and hexagon test.

All questions on this comprehensive quiz are in reference to this question stem. This quiz displays 20 random questions from the question bank so try each quiz multiple times. Good luck!

 

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Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists

This page contains CSCS comprehensive questions to prepare for the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) exam. Certified strength and conditioning specialists are fitness professionals. They are specially trained and experienced in using the application of scientific principles to improve athletic performance. Certified strength and conditioning specialists assist athletes by designing and implementing strength and conditioning programs. Certified strength and conditioning specialists (CSCS) conducting sport-specific performance testing, provide guidance with nutrition, and assist with injury prevention strategies (NSCA, 2015).

Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist Exam

The Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) exam by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) is a four-hour-long, pencil and paper or computer-based examination. The Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist exam has two sections: “Scientific Foundations” and “Practical / Applied.” Each of these sections consist of questions that the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) feels are relevant to test the knowledge and experience of a candidate for the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) professional credential. Certified strength conditioning specialist comprehensive questions from the Scientific Foundations section include anatomy, exercise physiology, biomechanics, and nutrition. certified strength conditioning specialist comprehensive questions from the Practical / Applied section include program design, exercise techniques, testing and evaluation, and organization / administration (NSCA, 2015).

CSCS Comprehensive Questions

This quiz features CSCS comprehensive questions from Essentials of Strength Training & Conditioning (3rd edition) textbook by Thomas R. Baechle and Roger W. Earle. This is the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) recommended textbook to prepare for the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) exam (NSCA, 2015)


CSCS comprehensive questions Essentials of Strength Training and ConditioningClick to see this textbook at Amazon.com

References:
National Strength and Conditioning Association. (2015, June 1). NSCA Certification Handbook. Retrieved from National Strength and Conditioning Association Website: http://www.nsca.com/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=36507225490

National Strength and Conditioning Association. (2015). CSCS Certification. Retrieved from National Strength and Conditioning Association: http://www.nsca.com/CSCS_Certification_2/

Links:
Certified Strength Conditioning Specialist Comprehensive Questions Set #1
Certified Strength Conditioning Specialist Comprehensive Questions Set #3
National Strength and Conditioning Association

 

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  6. Can you let me know what question you’re referring to if it’s not this particular question:

    The question asks for an example of negative reinforcement and the answer is to allow the athlete to skip wind sprints as a reward for good behavior. According to the Essentials of Strength Training & Conditioning (3rd edition) textbook p. 167, “negative reinforcement” is the removal of adverse stimuli as a reward for good behavior. The term “negative reinforcement” is commonly used by the layperson to describe a reward structure that encourages negative behavior. However, this is not how the term negative reinforcement is used in the strength and conditioning / sport psychology context.

    In the strength and conditioning context (as per the NSCA’s main textbook) here’s how to understand positive and negative:
    1) “Positive” means giving the athlete something good or bad.
    2) “Negative” means taking away from the athlete something good or bad.

    In the strength and conditioning context (as per the NSCA’s main textbook) here’s how to understand reinforcement and punishment:
    1) “Reinforcement” means that the action encourages the desired behavior (e.g. good technique, making the basket, catching the pass, etc.)
    2) “Punishment” means that the action discourages undesirable behavior (e.g. bad technique, missing the basket, dropping the pass, etc.)

    When you put the two components together…
    “Negative reinforcement” means to take away something so that the desired behavior is encouraged. The athlete will continue to do the desired behavior if you take away something they don’t like (e.g. taking away wind sprints).

    “Negative punishment” means to take away something so that the undesirable behavior is discouraged. The athlete will stop the undesirable behavior if you take away something they like (e.g. taking away ice cream).

    “Positive reinforcement” means to give the athlete something so that the desired behavior is encouraged. The athlete will continue to do the desired behavior is you give them something they like (e.g. giving ice cream).

    “Positive punishment” means to give the athlete something so that the undesirable behavior is discouraged. The athlete will stop the undesirable behavior if you give them something they don’t like (e.g. giving them wind sprints).

  7. You want Sam to give his best effort in the tests. Which of the following would be an example of negative reinforcement?

    The answer that is marked correct on this question would be positive reinforcement. I believe this is the question that is marked incorrectly.

    Thank you for all of this content!

  8. You want Sam to give his best effort in the tests. Which of the following would be an example of negative reinforcement?

    Same situation with this question

  9. Can you let me know what question you’re referring to if it’s not this particular question:

    The question asks for an example of negative reinforcement and the answer is to allow the athlete to skip wind sprints as a reward for good behavior. According to the Essentials of Strength Training & Conditioning (3rd edition) textbook p. 167, “negative reinforcement” is the removal of adverse stimuli as a reward for good behavior. The term “negative reinforcement” is commonly used by the layperson to describe a reward structure that encourages negative behavior. However, this is not how the term negative reinforcement is used in the strength and conditioning / sport psychology context.

    In the strength and conditioning context (as per the NSCA’s main textbook) here’s how to understand positive and negative:
    1) “Positive” means giving the athlete something good or bad.
    2) “Negative” means taking away from the athlete something good or bad.

    In the strength and conditioning context (as per the NSCA’s main textbook) here’s how to understand reinforcement and punishment:
    1) “Reinforcement” means that the action encourages the desired behavior (e.g. good technique, making the basket, catching the pass, etc.)
    2) “Punishment” means that the action discourages undesirable behavior (e.g. bad technique, missing the basket, dropping the pass, etc.)

    When you put the two components together…
    “Negative reinforcement” means to take away something so that the desired behavior is encouraged. The athlete will continue to do the desired behavior if you take away something they don’t like (e.g. taking away wind sprints).

    “Negative punishment” means to take away something so that the undesirable behavior is discouraged. The athlete will stop the undesirable behavior if you take away something they like (e.g. taking away ice cream).

    “Positive reinforcement” means to give the athlete something so that the desired behavior is encouraged. The athlete will continue to do the desired behavior is you give them something they like (e.g. giving ice cream).

    “Positive punishment” means to give the athlete something so that the undesirable behavior is discouraged. The athlete will stop the undesirable behavior if you give them something they don’t like (e.g. giving them wind sprints).

  10. Can you let me know what question you’re referring to if it’s not this particular question:

    The question asks for an example of negative reinforcement and the answer is to allow the athlete to skip wind sprints as a reward for good behavior. According to the Essentials of Strength Training & Conditioning (3rd edition) textbook p. 167, “negative reinforcement” is the removal of adverse stimuli as a reward for good behavior. The term “negative reinforcement” is commonly used by the layperson to describe a reward structure that encourages negative behavior. However, this is not how the term negative reinforcement is used in the strength and conditioning / sport psychology context.

    In the strength and conditioning context (as per the NSCA’s main textbook) here’s how to understand positive and negative:
    1) “Positive” means giving the athlete something good or bad.
    2) “Negative” means taking away from the athlete something good or bad.

    In the strength and conditioning context (as per the NSCA’s main textbook) here’s how to understand reinforcement and punishment:
    1) “Reinforcement” means that the action encourages the desired behavior (e.g. good technique, making the basket, catching the pass, etc.)
    2) “Punishment” means that the action discourages undesirable behavior (e.g. bad technique, missing the basket, dropping the pass, etc.)

    When you put the two components together…
    “Negative reinforcement” means to take away something so that the desired behavior is encouraged. The athlete will continue to do the desired behavior if you take away something they don’t like (e.g. taking away wind sprints).

    “Negative punishment” means to take away something so that the undesirable behavior is discouraged. The athlete will stop the undesirable behavior if you take away something they like (e.g. taking away ice cream).

    “Positive reinforcement” means to give the athlete something so that the desired behavior is encouraged. The athlete will continue to do the desired behavior is you give them something they like (e.g. giving ice cream).

    “Positive punishment” means to give the athlete something so that the undesirable behavior is discouraged. The athlete will stop the undesirable behavior if you give them something they don’t like (e.g. giving them wind sprints).

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