Cost to Become a Strength and Conditioning Coach

What does it cost to become a strength and conditioning coach?

cost to become a strength and conditioning coach

Glad to hear this question! The fact that you’re concerned about the cost to become a strength and conditioning coach shows that you’re thinking. It all comes down to cost versus benefit right? Having a realistic picture of the cost to become a strength and conditioning coach will help you to determine if this is a financially and professionally feasible path for you to take. For the sake of this article, we’ll just be talking about the costs involved in the two major strength and conditioning coach certifications:

  1. Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) from the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA)
  2. Strength and Conditioning Coach Certified (SCCC) from the Collegiate Strength and Conditioning Coaches Association (CSCCa)

Cost to Become a Strength and Conditioning Coach

Cost to Become a NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS):

NSCA Complete Study Package: $423 (NSCA members)
NSCA CSCS Exam Fee: $340 (NSCA members)
NSCA Membership Fee: $65 (student membership)
CPR / AED Certification: $70
College Transcripts: $10

Total Cost: $908


 

Cost to Become a Strength and Conditioning Coach

Cost to become a Strength and Conditioning Coach Certified though the CSCCa:

CSCCa recommended textbooks: $635
CSCCa SCCC Exam Fee: $350
CSCCa Membership Fee: $50 (student membership)
CPR / AED Certification: $70
CSCCa Internship Fee: $225
College Transcripts: $10
Travel to Exam Site: $500 (2016 Fort Worth, Texas)

Total Cost: $1,840


 

So there you have it; average cost to become a strength and conditioning coach in the United States from the two most recognizable organizations. Costs may be higher or lower depending on your market, but in general it costs about twice as much to obtain the CSCCa SCCC certification as it costs to obtain the NSCA’s CSCS certification. By the way, neither of these estimates takes into account that you need a bachelor’s degree to receive a credential from either organization. Considering that the average cost of a four-year degree (and associated expenses) is around $100,000 from in-state schools, we thought we’d leave that figure off the estimate.

While the SCCC is more difficult and expensive to obtain at this point in time, there doesn’t appear to be more benefit over the CSCS. Both credentials are recognized in the strength training and conditioning field with the SCCC perhaps carrying more prestige among those actually in the strength training profession. You will have to determine for yourself if it is worth the additional time and money to pursue a credential that may or may not yield much benefit in your future work as a strength and conditioning professional.

Not sure if the price is worth it? Check out our list of the highest paid strength and conditioning coaches in the United States.

 

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